brenco machines

Fruit machine - Copper Baron

 

Brenco - Header 1
Brenco - Header 1
Brenco - Header 1

 

Fruit machine - Show Jump
Fruit machine - Jockey Club

Show Jump (Oct 1970)

At 1p play 10p jackpot, Show Jump was basically one game divided into 2 spins with a garanteed hold in the middle. Unless you got a win on the first spin that is, in which case the machine would pay out and the game would end.

All the following 4 machines, Show Jump, Jockey Club, Copper Prince and Copper King all had the same 'two games for one feature'. Also, I've divided all the information between these 4 machines as it applies to all of them, unless otherwise stated.

This is a machine I remember seeing around from time to time, but it didn't seem to be very common. Show Jump originally cost £295 to buy new. Photo courtesy of Coin Slot.

Jockey Club (Oct 1970)

A 1/2p 'insersion' 20p jackpot pub machine. Jockey Club was the second machine to have the 'two games for one' feature. Early in 1970 the Gaming Board indicated that the 'hold' feature was to be made illegal because it was unfair and somehow gave some people an advantage. This prompted some manufacturers to experement with hold variations. These 4 machines making up part of their 1971 range are Brencos answer. The idea was not to give a hold at the start of the spin but to instead give one sandwiched in the middle between spin 1 and spin 2 of the same 'game'. This way the player would not know what combination he would be given holds on and that would make the hold fair and legal.

Jockey Club was part of Brencos 1971 range and originally cost £295 to buy new. Photo courtesy of Coin Slot.

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Fruit machine - Silver Bullion

Built to run alongside the 2p play Silver Chest, Silver Bullion was on 1p play. Available only through Brenco's distributors, London Coin. Mains voltage.

Silver Bullion (Apr 1972)

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Copper King - Total 383
Gold Rush - Total 381

Gold Rush (Oct 1970)

At 1p play 25p jackpot gold award, Gold Rush was billed as having 'random holds' with the chance of hold after hold, but no hold after a win. It was fitted with a "random holds unit" and was aparently "All quite legal according to the gaming board!"  Also there's a well displayed "draw" feature of the gold award coins being on full view behind the top panel. Originally cost £320 to buy new. Photo courtesy of Coin Slot.

Copper King (Oct 1970)

At 1p play 10p jackpot, Copper King was the fourth and last machine to have the 'two games for one' feature. None of these 4 machines had start buttons and when the hold was offered the player only had a few seconds to make a selection before the reels would automatically spin. After the 'holds' ruling was over, many people in the trade were not happy and viewed the whole thing as a waste of time and money. It was generally agreed and written up in Coin Slot that the problem was the type of people who sit on the gaming board. People that know nothing about fruit machines, never play them and haven't got the knowledge to make informed decisions. Copper King originally cost £295 to buy new. Photo courtesy of Coin Slot.

Fruit machine - Copper Prince

A 1/2p 'insersion' 20p jackpot pub fruit machine. Copper Prince was the third machine to have the 'two games for one' feature. Shortly after these 4 machines were released the Gaming Board clarified their position regarding the hold feature. After much tooing and frowing between operators, manufacturers and the gaming board. The Gaming Board ruled that the hold feature could stay if the word 'random' was written on the glass, as in 'random holds'.

However, the problem was, before the Gaming Board got involved holds were already random, the only difference was it never had to be stated on the screen.

Copper Prince was part of Brencos 1971 range and originally cost £295 to buy new.  Thanks to Steven Huntley of Swallow amusements for the photo.

Copper Prince (Oct 1970)

A 1p play arcade machine with 2 - 10p payouts. To keep the Gaming Board happy, Copper Baron was billed as having "random holds" incorporating "complete random selection". Originally cost £295 to buy new. Mains voltage. Copper Duke is the 1/2p version, below.

Copper Baron (Dec 1970)

At 1p play 10p jackpot, Silver Strike was billed as having a well displayed "draw" feature of the 10 pence coins being on full view behind the top panel. Costing £320 to buy new and like all early Brencos mains voltage.

Fruit machine - Silver Strike

Silver Strike (Dec 1970)

Copper Duke - Total 378

Copper Duke (Dec 1970)

Half penny insersion 2 - 20p payout. To keep the Gaming Board happy, Copper Duke was also billed as having "random holds" incorporating "complete random selection". Originally cost £295 to buy new. Mains voltage. Photo courtesy of Coin Slot.

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Castle Royal (March 1971)

Castle Royal had  the new "Costa Brava" feature and was hurridly prepared by Brenco for London Coin for inclusion in the 10th Northern Amusement Exhibition held in Blackpool. The reason being the Gaming Board had just accepted a new feature as being legal.

Known as "Costa Brava" the player can have a 50% chance of a hold on a jackpot win. What makes this unusual is the 50% chance stayed the same no matter how many times it held. In theory this gives the player an outside chance of winning £3 or £4 or even more through multiple holds. In tests carried out by County Automatics the longest sequence they encountered was 19 holds in succsession. I'm assuming this feature didn't go anywhere because in my experience getting more than 3 holds on any machine was virtually impossible!

Penny Popper - Total 379
Triple Tap - Total 378

Penny Popper (March 1971)

Penny Triple Tap (March 1971)

Penny Popper was described as a 9 pence jackpot "flip-coin" machine, where the operator pays no tax. The player has to "flip" his coin across the play field in an effort to get it through the payout pins. Penny Popper is housed in a timber case with a front opening cash box and was originally mounted on a pedestal.

Penny Triple Tap was described as a 10 pence jackpot "flip-coin" machine, where the operator pays no tax. The player has to "flip" his coin across the play field in an effort to get it through the payout pins. Unlike Penny Popper, the player has 3 seperate attempts to use his skill to win. Penny Triple Tap is housed in a timber case with a front opening cash box and was originally mounted on a pedestal.

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